RTF I: Genomic diversity in chronic inflammatory diseases

Coordinators: Jeanette Erdmann (UzL), Andre Franke (CAU)

RTF I employs large cohorts and genetic data in order to improve our understanding of the causes of chronic inflammatory diseases. For this purpose, extensive sequencing data is combined with other high-dimensional data and continuously updated clinical information. As a key resource in PMI, RTF I aims to generate Germany's largest genetic data set for inflammatory diseases.

What does this research area’s work build on?

In recent years, extensive genetic maps have been created for various inflammatory diseases, i.e. we now know most common genetic risk factors. Therefore the scientists in RTF I have experience with identifying genetic risk factors and have built up the appropriate resources for doing so, such as mapping technologies and analytics as well as large DNA collections.

 

What are the main research objectives?

The main goals of RTF I are

  1. generating one of the biggest inflammation cohort data sets for genetic, clinical and epidemiological research,
  2. identifying and characterizing new disease genes, and in particular detecting and determining the frequently "hidden" monogenic cases,
  3. identifying rare variants and study genetic resistance, so-called “resilience”,
  4. identifying clinical phenotypes that are associated with genetic variants of the known function (PheWAS),
  5. verifying new pharmacogenomic variants for targeted inflammation therapies and
  6. identifying risk and protective factors in first-degree relatives of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases.
What makes this research area special?

A unique feature is patient education and our informed patient consent that is used at the USKH in Kiel, the so-called "broad consent". On this basis, the researchers were able to build up an integrated biobank in hospital operations, which we term “healthcare-integrated biobanking”. Patients and physicians support the research with data and samples without any restrictions to routine healthcare. With the help of this infrastructure, the scientists have collected samples and data from over 20,000 patients (status January 2020, further information: https://www.uksh.de/kohorte/en/ ) at the USKH for PMI research purposes so far. RTF I is planning a genetic analysis of the entire cohort and wants to generate Germany's largest genetic data set for inflammatory diseases.

 

What does the research area contribute to precision medicine in chronic inflammation?

RTF I will make an important contribution to precision medicine by identifying and resolving "hidden" monogenic and oligogenic causes of disease in patients from the “normal” hospital routine. The reclassification of the disease manifestation, the identification of efficient preclinical/subclinical disorders and pharmacogenomic markers are prerequisites for each precision medicine approach and important points in the RTF I research program. Cross-disease analyses will help to identify both common as well as disease-specific susceptibility factors, reveal pleiotropic variants, highlight comprehensive treatment paths and enable a better understanding of the comorbidities. Overall, RTF I strives for a complete dissolution of the genetic taxonomy of inflammatory diseases and their possible transfer into clinical care at an individual level.

 

Cooperation with other research areas in the cluster
  • RTF II for integration of the microbiome data
  • RTF VI for sequence-based analyses
  • RTF X for family studies ("kindred cohorts") and clinical cohorts from the CCIMs.
Members

Dr. Zouhair Aherrahrou

Associated member

University of Lübeck
Institute for Cardiogenetics

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Norbert Arnold

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Laboratory of Oncology

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Petra Bacher

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Department of Immunology

Prof. Dr. John Baines

Full member

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology
Institute of Experimental Medicine
Evolutionary Genomics

Prof. Dr. Lars Bertram

Full member

University of Lübeck
Lübeck Interdisciplinary Platform for Genome Analytics (LIGA)

Prof. Dr. Hauke Busch

Full member

UKSH Campus Lübeck
Lübeck Institute for Experimental Dermatology
System Biology of Inflammatory Diseases

Prof. Dr. med. Dr. rer. nat. Ingolf Cascorbi

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Institute of Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Astrid Dempfle

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Institute of Medical Informatics and Statistics

Prof. Dr. Ingo Eitel

Full member

UKSH Campus Lübeck
Medical Department II

Dr. Eva Ellinghaus

Full member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
Centre for Molecular Biosciences

Prof. Dr. David Ellinghaus

Full member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
Centre for Molecular Biosciences

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Hila Emmert

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology

Prof. Dr. Jeanette Erdmann

Full member

University of Lübeck
Institute for Cardiogenetics

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Andre Franke

Full member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
Genetics & Bioinformatics

Dr. Jeanette Franzenburg

Associated member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology

Dr. rer. nat. Sandra Freitag-Wolf

Associated member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Institute of Medical Informatics and Statistics

Prof. Dr. Timo Gemoll

Associated member

UKSH Campus Lübeck
Department of General Surgery

Dr. Yask Gupta

Associated member

UKSH Campus Lübeck
Lübeck Institute for Experimental Dermatology
Model Systems of Inflammatory Skin Diseases

Dr. Matthias Hübenthal

Associated member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology

Prof. Dr. Saleh Ibrahim

Full member

UKSH Campus Lübeck
Lübeck Institute for Experimental Dermatology
Genetics of Inflammatory Diseases

Prof. Dr. Josef Ingenerf

Full member

University of Lübeck
Institute for Medical Informatics

Prof. Dr. med. Ralf Junker

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Central laboratory

Prof. Dr. Christine Klein

Full member

University of Lübeck
Institute of Neurogenetics

Prof. Dr. Inke König

Full member

University of Lübeck
Institute for Medical Biometrics and Statistics

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Ben Krause-Kyora

Full member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
Ancient DNA Research

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Michael Krawczak

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Institute of Medical Informatics and Statistics

Dr. Tobias Lenz

Full member

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology
Evolutionary Immunogenomics

Prof. Dr. med. Wolfgang Lieb

Full member

Kiel University
Institute of Epidemiology

Dr. rer. nat. Britt-Sabina Löscher

Associated member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
Centre for Molecular Biosciences

Prof. Dr. rer. physiol. Edmund Maser

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists

Prof. Almut Nebel

Full member

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology
Longevity Ancient DNA Research

Prof. Dr. Dirk Nowotka

Full member

Kiel University
Department of Computer Science
Dependable Systems

Dr. Tobias Reinberger, geb. Schöne

Associated member

University of Lübeck
Institute for Cardiogenetics

Dr. agr. Kristina Schlicht

Associated member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Department of Internal Medicine I
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Medicine

Prof. Dr. med. Stefan Schreiber

Spokesperson

Kiel University
Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology

Prof. Dr. Silke Szymczak

Full member

University of Lübeck
Institute for Medical Biometrics and Statistics

Prof. Dr. Diamant Thaçi

Full member

UKSH Campus Lübeck
Comprehensive Center for Inflammation Medicine (CCIM)

Prof. Dr. Stephan Weidinger

Full member

UKSH Campus Kiel
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology

Dr. Inken Wohlers

Associated member

University of Lübeck
Lübeck Institute for Experimental Dermatology
Medical Systems Biology